Die Relicta – Relicta Aeternum

MNMN Records (MNMN422), 2016

I write a lot about “ambient music,” but I’ve always grappled with that second word. Much of what I listen to isn’t really music at all, in the traditional sense, but cleverly arranged and processed sound collages that create unique atmospheres. Some of my favorite ambient albums don’t have a single note of melody in them whatsoever. So I am constantly asking myself: is this really music? What is music, at its most basic level?

Ambient music implies the creation of sounds that are part of the environment, whether natural or imagined, and tend to shift the listener’s experience from conscious to subconscious to, at times, the unconscious. It meshes with your perception in a surreal way that traditional note-based music rarely does; indeed, this is part of its attraction.

By this reasoning, I’m not entirely sure I’d call Relicta Aeternum an ambient album at all. Russian project Die Relicta’s sole release ticks the electronic and beatless boxes on the ambient checklist, but the similarities stop there. This is an album of solemn melody, of profound emotion conjured through the procession of notes. There’s tendency to label albums like this as “cinematic” or “faux soundtrack,” and while this is tempting, it’s not always applicable. Relicta Aeternum falls somewhere between the drifty compositions of the Spotted Peccary discography, and the isolationist gloom that tends to dominate Cryo Chamber and Cyclic Law labels. Die Relicta’s beauty is melancholic, but never despairingly so.

What also separates Relicta Aeternum from bright-air New-Age ambient are the lightly scraping loops of sampled noise that thread among its dusty hymn-like arias. The resulting mood – part cathedral-inspired numinous and part abandoned factory – recalls Peter Andersson’s early work as raison d’etre: a sense of awe and reverence for something elusively and exclusively beyond oneself; the mystery of The Other juxtaposed with the constructed. There’s joy and sorrow to be found in the ephemeral; how the remnants of the past hint at former glory, which once shone bright and strong but has lost its essence forever. And yet, there is wonder to be found in the fact such wonders existed at all, and the implication is that such a pinnacle will be reached once again.

This is the message Die Relicta has provided. While Relicta Aeternum is short at thirty-three minutes, each of the five tracks is a grand and stirring jewel. The album’s title translates roughly as “leaving forever,” and the reverential sense of parting and the beginning of a new path have been powerfully captured by Die Relicta. Call it ambient, call it cinematic, call it what you will – but Relicta Aeternum, by any name, is sublime.

Advertisements